Why does my knitting keep getting bigger?

If the sides of your knitting aren’t straight, but instead have little steps on either side, the knitting gets wider as you go along, or you have holes in your knitting, you are accidentally adding extra stitches. … There are two ways that stitches are frequently added to the knitting.

Why is my knitted blanket getting wider?

A very common cause of crochet projects getting wider is that extra stitches are being made. For example, if your project is supposed to be 10 stitches wide, but you’re making more than 10 stitches in the row, your project will get wider. … But you’re accidentally making a stitch in that base, leading to an extra stitch.

Why is my yarn getting longer?

If you are not super careful, keeping the needle tips close together, then you create slack between the needles with every stitch you knit, and if you have more than a few stitches, the strand of yarn will grow to ridiculous lengths.

How do I stop my knitted blanket from curling?

The most well known method to prevent curling is by blocking. How do you do that? When you’re finished knitting your project and you’ve bound off your stitches, put your garment into tepid water with a bit of pH neutral soap. Let the wool soak for about 30 minutes, but don’t rub!

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Why is my scarf getting wider as I crochet?

If your work is getting wider and you didn’t intend for it to, that means you’ve unknowingly added stitches somewhere. To trim your project back down to size, count the stitches in the last row to determine how many extra stitches you have.

Why does the yarn get so tight when I knit?

Give the whole needle some love

A lot of the times, tight knitters will knit into their stitches using the tip of the needle without letting the stitch slide all the way onto the needle. This doesn’t expand the stitch to the full width of the needle – only a fraction of its width! That’s why the stitches are so tight.

Why is my knitting uneven?

Uneven knitting is sometimes caused by different tension between knit and purl rows (also known as “rowing out”). If you look at the purl side of your stockinette stitch and there are pairs of purl rows with deep “gutters” in between, it is likely that this is the problem.