Question: What does with NAP mean in sewing?

Well, it all has to do with how you layout your pattern pieces on your fabric before cutting! When laying “without” nap, the hem or lower edges of your pattern pieces are pointing to opposite ends of the fabric. A layout “with” nap, indicates that the lower edges of the pieces point to the same end of the fabric.

What does nap mean on a sewing pattern?

“With nap” means that you cut all the pattern pieces (even the facing) in the SAME direction, and “without nap” means that you can cut regardless of the direction (just don’t forget to follow the grain line though). The layout “with nap” doesn’t necessarily mean that you will use fabric with pile (like velvet).

What does it mean if a fabric has a nap?

Primarily, nap is the raised (fuzzy) surface on certain kinds of cloth, such as velvet or moleskin. … When cloth, especially woollen cloth, is woven, the surface of the cloth is not smooth, and this roughness is the nap. Generally the cloth is then “sheared” to create an even surface, and the nap is thus removed.

How will you layout a fabric with nap?

If your fabric has nap, all of the pattern pieces must be laid in the same direction. Fabric with a one-way design will also use the “with nap” cutting layout so that the design on the fabric all runs in the same direction on the finished item.

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How do I know if my fabric is napping?

Nap or napped fabric simply refers to a fabric that has a fluffy raised surface (also called pile) which generally goes in one direction. When you feel down fabric with a nap, it should feel smooth. If you stroke the pile in the opposite direction, it often feels rough.

What does with nap or without nap mean in sewing?

When laying “without” nap, the hem or lower edges of your pattern pieces are pointing to opposite ends of the fabric. A layout “with” nap, indicates that the lower edges of the pieces point to the same end of the fabric.

Can you use a With nap layout even if you do not have napped fabric?

Pile fabrics, which require a “with-nap layout,” include velvet, velveteen, corduroy, fleece, terry cloth, fake fur and bouclé amongst others. … If they don’t, the fabric has nap. If you still aren’t sure, use the cutting layout and sewing suggestions for nap fabric, just in case.

Does linen have a nap?

Quite simply, a napped fabric, or fabric nap, is the fuzzy, textured side of a fabric. … Wool and cotton fabrics are processed with a raised nap as part of the manufacturing process. The nap is then trimmed before finishing. Linen fabric doesn’t have nap.

Does polyester have nap?

Common fabrics that are napped are wool and cotton flannel, flannel-back satin, polyester fleece, flannelette, and outing flannel. Sueded fabrics are also napped through a process that includes an additional step to shear the nap close to the surface of the fabric to produce a smooth, soft finish.

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